Classics Colloquia

The Europaeum Classics Colloquia Series

The Europaeum sponsors a special graduate research seminar and workshop for Classics students and scholars from across our network of universities. Now continuing past its tenth year, this annual weekend in the autumn brings together top scholars and advanced graduates to discuss a specific theme or new discovery from the past 12 months.

The Europaeum supports a number of regular Event Series aimed to bring together top leaders to revisit pressing issues. Click below to learn more about these Series:

Classics Colloquium : The Power of the Word

05/11/2015 - 15:35
07/11/2015 - 21:35
Etc/GMT
Marcus AureliusMarcus Aurelius

Some 16 young Classics scholars from seven partner universities took part in a lively Classics Colloquia earlier this month at Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona. on the theme Poetry, Oratory, Rhetoric, Persuasion: The Power of the Word in Ancient Times. They explored all these dimensions including politics, literature, culture, religion, philosophy, history and others  This will be the 13th in our series, led  by Professor Emilio Suárez de la Torre from Pompeu Fabra University, and other academic experts from Bologna and Charles University, Prague.  For the published abstracts of the various papers presented at the conference - see here. For the full programme, see here  and see here for a list of all participants.

Classics Coloquium, November 2014

Tags:
06/11/2014 - 00:30
08/11/2014 - 19:00
Etc/GMT
This year the Europaeum resumes its pioneering series of Classics Colloquium after a one year interregnum, at Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne, for some 20 advanced Classics graduates. The theme this year is Man and Beast. There are many dichotomies to explore, captured so well by the inevitable Aristotle "For man, when perfected, is the best of animals, but, when separated from law and justice, he is the worst of all." This will be the 11th in our series and we will work with Dr Dimitri El Murr from Paris 1, who has taken part in a number of previous workshops (see here for a list of previous workshops to Essential pages - which we used recently) and we have invited our network of colleagues from Helsinki, Krakow, Prague, Oxford, Madrid, Barcelona and Bologna. For more information and details see the attached poster or read the abstract here

Classics Colloquium, November 2012

Tags:
16/11/2012 - 00:00
18/11/2012 - 23:59
Etc/GMT
Event

Eleventh Classics Colloquium:
Leadership in the Ancient World
University of Oxford

For this year’s Classics Colloquium – the eleventh in its series –, we will look at Leadership in the Ancient World from several angles, including politics, literature, culture, religion, philosophy, history and others.

Classics graduate scholars at member universities of the Europaeum are invited to take part in this Colloquium, which aims to bring young European classics scholars together with leading academic experts, with the chance to present papers for discussion and critique by a fellow scholar.

Classics Colloquium, October 2011

Tags:
21/10/2011 - 00:00
22/10/2011 - 23:59
Etc/GMT
Zeus and Hermes - The Strangers in the VillageZeus and Hermes -
The Strangers in the Village

Tenth Classics Colloquium:
Strangers and Friends

University of Helsinki

The theme for the 2011 Classics Colloquium – the tenth in our series – was Strangers and Friends, hosted by the University of Helsinki on October 21st - 22nd. Classics graduate scholars at member universities of the Europaeum and leading academic experts came together to present their papers for discussion and critique by fellow scholars. This year Helsinki welcomed graduates from Paris, Oxford, Bologna, Bonn, Krakow, Prague, Madrid and Leiden and young scholars from Oxford and Paris. Click here for a full list of participants.

Some of the themes covered included the impacts of Roman imperialism, war, city life, culture and religion and myth. Click here for Programme and List of Abstracts.

Classics Colloquium, November 2010

Tags:
19/11/2010 - 00:00
21/11/2010 - 23:59
Etc/GMT
Apotheosis of Antoninus PiusApotheosis of Antoninus Pius

Ninth Classics Colloquium:
Death and the Afterlife

Jagiellonian University, Krakow

19-21 November 2010

The theme for the 2010 Classics Colloquium – the ninth in our series – will be Death and the Afterlife. This theme will include a broad range of subjects and areas of research: linguistics, literature, culture, religion, philosophy, archeology, art history and others. Classics graduate scholars at member universities of the Europaeum are invited to take part in this Colloquium, which aims to bring young European classics scholars together with leading academic experts, with the chance to present papers for discussion and critique by a fellow scholar.

Classics Colloquium, November 2009

Tags:
06/11/2009 - 00:00
08/11/2009 - 23:59
Etc/GMT
Plato and AristotlePlato and Aristotle

Eighth Classics Colloquium:
Teaching, Teachers and Students

Charles University, Prague
6-8th November 2009

Conference Coordinator: Martina Vanikova, Charles University, Prague

The theme for the 2009 Classics Colloquium‚ the eighth in our series‚ was Teaching, Teachers and Students. This theme included Greek education and attitudes; sophistry and philosophy; pedagogy; didacticism; Roman education and attitudes; and literary depictions of teaching and learning. Classics graduate scholars at member universities of the Europaeum took part in this Colloquium, which aimed to bring young European classics scholars together with leading academic experts, presenting papers for discussion and critique by a fellow scholar.

Classics Colloquium, November 2008

Tags:
20/11/2008 - 00:00
21/11/2008 - 23:59
Etc/GMT

Seventh Classics Colloquium:
Metamorphosis between Science and Literature

University of Bologna
Dipartimento di Storie e Metodi per la Conservazione dei Beni Culturali
20-21st November 2008


Conference Coordinator: Professor Francesco Citti, Professor of Classics, University of Bologna

The theme for the 2008 Classics Colloquium – seventh in the series – was on the classical concept of Metamorphosis, both its literal and metaphorical meanings. It included both scientific subjects such as alchemy and chemistry, and literary themes such as intertextuality, disguising, pastiche, translation, and so forth.

Classics Colloquium, November 2007

Tags:
23/11/2007 - 00:00
24/11/2007 - 23:59
Etc/GMT

Sixth Classics Colloquium:
Myth, Culture, Society: Europaeum Classics Colloquium in memory of Jean-Pierre Vernant

University of Oxford
23-24 November 2007

Conference Coordinator: Professor Stephen Harrison, Professor of Classics, University of Oxford

Jean-Pierre Vernant (1914-2007) was a towering figure in the field of classics, both in his native France and internationally. The citation for his honorary doctorate at Oxford in 1999 reads as follows: 'A scholar of great learning, whose work has illuminated early Greece, and a man who has served his country with great distinction.'

Classics Colloquium, November 2006

Tags:
17/11/2006 - 00:00
19/11/2006 - 23:59
Etc/GMT

Fifth Classics Colloquium:
The Orient, Greece, & Rome

Complutense University, Madrid
17-19th November 2006

Conference Coordinator: Professor Alberto Bernabe, Professor of Classics, Complutense University, Madrid

In The Orientalizing Revolution, Walter Burkert attempts to correct our distorted view of Ancient Greek culture as a miraculous phenomenon owing practically nothing to its neighbours. Recently there have been many studies on the influences or connections between Classical and Oriental cultures and progress in the edition and interpretation of Hittite, Mesopotamian, Iranian, Egyptian and Ugaritic texts, which have opened up new intercultural perspectives. It is also clear that the Roman encounter with Greece and the Orient introduced new ideas, customs and forms of worship which transformed Rome’s vision, as recorded by contemporary literature.

Classics Colloquium, November 2005

Tags:
25/11/2005 - 00:00
27/11/2005 - 23:59
Etc/GMT

Fourth Classics Colloquium: Tears in the Ancient World
Universiteit Leiden
25-27th November 2005


Conference Coordinators:Professor Joan Booth, Professor of Classics, University of Leiden; and, Professor Philip Hardie, Professor of Classics, University of Oxford

[Natura] hominem tantum nudum et in nuda humo natali die abicit ad uagitus statim et ploratum.

‘Man alone Nature deposits naked on the naked ground at the time of his birth immediately to wail and cry’.

With these words Pliny the Elder (NH 7.2) claims the capacity for shedding tears to be one of the things that make us human. It is an activity that crosses the boundaries of time, nationality and culture: an appropriate subject, then, for a colloquium on Classical Antiquity involving ten universities across modern Europe. The aim of the colloquium was to consider how tears in the ancient Greek and Roman era are regarded, depicted and explained – in literature and in visual art, by philosophers, scholars and scientists. Who weeps in the classical world, and why? Is it thought good for them or not? Are their tears disfiguring or attractive? Do classical women weep more than men or vice versa? Are Greek and Roman tears at all ritualistic? Are ‘crocodile tears’ a recognised phenomenon? How is the physiology of tears understood? What, if any, Nachleben does classical weeping have? These are some of the questions that contributors were invited to address.

Classics Colloquium, November 2003

Tags:
22/11/2003 - 00:00
23/11/2003 - 23:59
Etc/GMT

Third Classics Colloquium: Methods and Traditions of Graduate Research: Approaches to Herodotus and Tacitus’s Annals
University of Oxford
20-22nd November 2003


The third EUROPAEUM Classics Graduate Colloquium took place this autumn at Oxford over a long weekend, with representatives from Bonn, Leiden, Geneva, Bologna, and Madrid.

Classics Colloquium, 2001 & 2002

Tags:

First and Second Classics Colloquia
University of Oxford
2001 & 2002


The Ancient Romans were, of course, great travellers. But how did it all work without lastminute.com?

On a chilly November weekend in 2001, graduate students from the universities of Leiden, Prague, Bologna, Bonn, Geneva and Oxford, gathered for what effectively became a three-day festival incorporating tours, informal meetings, seminars, and an all-day colloquium on travel and tourism in ancient times.